Volume 9 - Issue 2

S.No Title & Authors Name Page
1
NEW MATHEMATICAL MODEL BASED ON THE KINETIC PROFILE FOR THE PREDICTION OF MULTISTAGE DRUG RELEASE FROM DELIVERY SYSTEMS
Navideh Abbasnezhad, Farid Bakir, Mohammadali Shirinbayan, Blandine Maurel
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML

Because of a broad number of interdependent effects occurring during the release of drugs from controlled delivery systems, the associated phenomena become complex. Despite the availability of many researches to simulate these pharmacokinetics and dynamic aspects, the applicable models stay limited. In this work, we have developed an innovative mathematical model to predict the multistage-profiles of drug release. Thanks to the succession use of power functions reproducing the kinetic profile, the universal applicability of the proposed modeling becomes possible. This mathematical model makes it possible, in other words, to propose a behaviour law for the family of drug-carriers studied after experimental data adjustment of their release
profiles. The physical mechanisms are not directly modelled here, but they are contained in the modelled kinetics. In this way any group of physical mechanisms, coupled or not, are taken into account. To assess the development’s accuracy; we compare a published data set to predictions. The chosen examples here exploit distinct results about the effects of the coupled flow rate, drug-concentration, and the radius of the cylinder of the micro-needle patches. Predictions of this model are reachable from accessible design factors; we expect so users will select it to guide the formulations of a broad range of custom drug delivery system.

1-8
2
THE IMPACT OF HERBAL MEDICINES USE IN PATIENTS UNDER HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RWANDA
Josiane Kabayundo, Raymond Muganga, Fabrice Humura, Derrick Barry Abila, Alumuku Iordepuun Micheal
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML

Background: Herbal medicine is widely used in many developing countries and its use is increasingly popular in western
world. However, information regarding the extent of herbal medicine use among people living with HIV under highly active
antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is limited in most settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to assess possible effects
caused by concomitant use of antiretroviral drugs with herbal medicines and determine the frequently used plants among
patients on antiretroviral therapy at Rango Health Center in Huye, the southern part of Rwanda.
Methods: A sample of 196 participants enrolled in HAART at Rango Health Center were selected using a simple random
sampling. Using questionnaires, information that assessed exposures to herbal medicines before initiating antiretroviral
therapy and while taking antiretrovirals were collected from consented participants. Data collected were analysed using
SPSS v.16.
Results: The study showed that 68.36% (n=134) used herbal medicines either before or after starting antiretroviral therapy.
The most used plant by our respondents was Tetradenia riparia (Umuravumba) at 24.76%, while 6.71% of all participants
who have used traditional medicines reported undesirable adverse effects. The main adverse effects experienced were gastric
irritation, severe nausea, diarrhea, and constipation. It is important to note that 85.93% of participants who used herbal
medicines alongside antiretroviral drugs reported disease improvement.
Conclusion: The prevalence of herbal medicine use among our respondents on HAART was high. This is of clinical and
pharmacological concerns; hence, the possibility of treatment change due to poor adherence because of the exacerbation of
Antiretrovirals (ARVs) side effects.

1-8
3
PATTERN OF ALBUMIN USE AT A MAJOR TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN RIYADH
Maram M Alghalbi
 Abstract                  View                 Download                 XML

Background: Albumin is a colloidal solution that counters the major part of human plasma protein. Since use of Albumin for
hospitalized patients were based on observational studies, there were a need to evaluate the unjustifiable use of albumin which
may have a negative impact on both patient’s clinical outcomes and health care cost.
Method: This is an observational retrospective and prospective study. It was conducted for a two month period to assess the
use of Albumin by using a regular follow-up for albumin prescription at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh.
Results: In this study which was conducted in 2019 for two month period, one thousand albumins prescriptions were reviewed
retrospectively and prospectively to the implementation of the institutional guideline. Data showed that, albumin 20% was
the most common prescribed concentration, majority of for albumin prescriptions were received from general medicine and
emergency physicians, whereas nephrology and intensive care units physicians have the highest percentage of re-prescribing
albumin. The most common indication for albumin use was under the category "others (O)" by 30% in the retrospective phase
and almost by 50% in the prospective phase. A total of 40% prescriptions were not validated as per the institutional guideline.
There was a significant correlation between category (O) use and inappropriate implementation of the institutional guideline
between age groups in terms of the duration and indications (P = 0.016). There was also a significant association between the
ward use of albumin, specifically intensive care units and oncology, and a lack of implementation of the guideline (P<0.0001).
The estimated cost due to unjustified use of albumin was almost 200000 SR between 5% and 20% of albumin concentrations.
Conclusion: Unjustified albumin use and improper implementation of institutional guideline is prevalent and correlated mainly
with category (O).

1-7